G-NBLV9GQF6L
top of page
52394394216_dd7c3d1c6f_c.jpg

COMMUNICATING with IMPACT

ABOUT THE PROGRAM 

“The most powerful person in the world is the storyteller”.

Steve Jobs

 

What if people could “get you” in a couple of minutes?


What if you could convey what drives you so clearly that it inspires others to follow you?

The purpose of your Personal Narrative – the Story of Self – is for others to understand why you care about certain issues. Through telling your Story, you will be able to share the core values that motivate you and guide your actions.

If you do not author your own Story, others likely will, and it may not be the story you want.

What to expect?

At this interactive workshop, you will learn tools and a process to define your Personal Narrative and be able to communicate your Story with impact whenever, wherever, and however you need.

This process is based on the Public Narrative Framework, the groundbreaking work of Marshall Ganz from Harvard Kennedy School, that for years has proven an invaluable tool for leaders across organizations. 

Our Facilitator, Irene Ohler, has studied the Public Narrative Framework directly with Marshall Ganz

Why stories?

Stories are a powerful mechanism for connection with others.

Stories enable us to communicate our values as lived experiences rather than abstract principles. They have the power to move people and create change by evoking shared values that inspire others to action.

You may think that your personal Story does not matter or that people are not interested. However, if you are engaged in public work or are leading an organization, you have the responsibility to offer an account of who you are, why you do what you do, and where you hope to lead.

Who should attend? 

Whether you are a leader who wants to inspire action, or an entrepreneur, or a professional who wants to communicate and network with purpose – the most impactful tool is your own Story.

 

“If you don’t author your public story, others will, and they may not tell it in the way that you like.”

Marshall Ganz, Harvard Kennedy School

WHAT PEOPLE SAY

bottom of page